New University study finds software for diagnosing and treating heart disease may be as good as a prescription

Researchers from the University of Minnesota and the University at Buffalo have used software developed for the monitoring of blood pressure and the heart to determine whether the new IBM Watson technology can actually be used to diagnose and treat heart disease.

The findings are published in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

The study was led by Dr. Christopher Dickey, an assistant professor of medicine and director of the Center for Computer Health & Life Sciences at the University Medical Center Utrecht.

“This is the first time we have used a software application to diagnose heart disease,” Dr. Dickey said.

Dr. J. Thomas Hoehn, the president and chief executive officer of the Watson Foundation, said in a statement, “This research is a tremendous step forward in understanding the health implications of Watson. “

Our results suggest that the Watson cognitive platform can be used for a variety of medical diagnostics, including heart disease, and it can be applied to various types of medical problems, including obesity, diabetes and cancer.”

Dr. J. Thomas Hoehn, the president and chief executive officer of the Watson Foundation, said in a statement, “This research is a tremendous step forward in understanding the health implications of Watson.

Our goal is to bring this technology to the medical field as a way to improve care and the quality of life for all.”

The study focused on IBM Watson’s Advanced Performance Computing platform, which IBM announced earlier this year.

Watson is a machine learning system that is designed to identify patterns in data.

The new study focused specifically on the type of information Watson can recognize: The use of words and phrases in text that describe a person’s condition or activity, or patterns in the behavior of people.

The data collected in the study included questions about a person and a physical health condition, and also the type and location of physical health conditions that the patient had.

The results showed that the software could identify heart disease in about 1 in 100 people who received the treatment.

The software was also able to identify diabetes in about 5% of patients who received treatment.

“These findings suggest that, at least in the lab, Watson can be useful for identifying and diagnosing heart disease and other conditions that affect the cardiovascular system,” Dr